Feb 272016
 

ted film crewJewelry appraisers have ample opportunities to quash the hopes and dreams of clients expecting to feather their nest egg when we value their heirloom jewelry.  But, then mom’s “alexandrite” or grandma’s five carat “ruby” turn out to be synthetic corundum and you are the heavy. So it was refreshing to participate in a feel good story recently that got world-wide attention for a few minutes.

The Call

So, I get this call one day from a lady who had dined in a local restaurant and bit down on something hard in her seafood dish.   I have had this story a few times before and have yet to give happy news to the diner.  Well, this lady said the thing was dark and spherical so she took it home and did some research, leading her to think she might have an elusive quahog pearl.  My initial reaction, as always, was to explain that I would have to examine it, but don’t get your hopes up. Continue reading »

Nov 132015
 

insuranceIn this article Auckland Valuer Paul Nilsson questions whether jewellery valuers have kept up with changes to domestic insurance policy wordings as they apply to jewellery.

Most Valuers would agree that when they write an insurance valuation on a piece of jewellery for a consumer their primary objective is to protect the owner.
Here are two scenarios where that objective may not have been met.
Consumer A had an estate diamond brooch professionally valued at $6000 and listed separately on their insurance policy for that amount. A year later they lost it and discovered it would cost $12,000 for the new replacement their policy entitled them to. However the insurance contract meant that the settlement was limited to the specified amount of $6000. Their Valuer had unfortunately only valued the brooch at its second-hand value.
Consumer B inherited their mothers’ engagement ring and had it valued for $2,000 and listed on their policy. When they made a claim 5 years later they discovered their policy only entitled them to a $400 pay out. The Valuer had valued it for replacement with a new one but their policy was for market value (indemnity value) not replacement.
More about these two scenarios later. Continue reading »

Feb 202015
 
Figure 1: Solid opal or opal doublet (composite)

Solid opal or opal doublet (composite)

Admin: Alan Hodgkinson is a Special Guest Author for the AIJV.  Here, Alan explores a tricky opal doublet.

It would certainly make life easier for the gemmologist/ appraiser if all composite gems were claw set, or even better if loose (unmounted) – wishful thinking of course. In such situations, the doublet joint is so easy to see.

Life was never meant to be so straightforward and there are situations where the junction plane of a doublet is concealed by a collar setting (figure 1). The pendant shown (Figure 2) provides a good example of the problem.

Continue reading »