Feb 202015
 
Figure 1: Solid opal or opal doublet (composite)

Solid opal or opal doublet (composite)

Admin: Alan Hodgkinson is a Special Guest Author for the AIJV.  Here, Alan explores a tricky opal doublet.

It would certainly make life easier for the gemmologist/ appraiser if all composite gems were claw set, or even better if loose (unmounted) – wishful thinking of course. In such situations, the doublet joint is so easy to see.

Life was never meant to be so straightforward and there are situations where the junction plane of a doublet is concealed by a collar setting (figure 1). The pendant shown (Figure 2) provides a good example of the problem.

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Jan 212012
 

Gemworld InternationalAIJV members, Gemworld International are laying on three important corundum classes in the UK in May 2012.

The pricing of ruby and sapphire, their  treatments and importantly, the assessment of these factors, are crucial knowledge for the Professional Jewellery Valuer and Gemmologist.

Below is an outline of the course, the venues (Perth, Birmingham and London), the instructors and the costings.

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Jan 162011
 

Admin: Renee Newman is a Guest Author for the AIJV.
Here, Renee comments on the need to consider transparency before making ill-informed quotes on value.

On January 11th, National Jeweler, posted a story entitled “Precious gems found in Detroit fish tank.”

An old fish tank there was found to be full of faceted and unfaceted gems. A gemologist told police that three of the stones alone could be worth more than $100,000. Continue reading »

Dec 292010
 

blog-ringI have always considered myself extremely fortunate that I have an opportunity in my work to see things that have perhaps never had a pair of human eyes clapped on them before.

In the course of examining gemstone inclusions I see many truly wonderous things and every now and then, I find something that tickles me.  Recently, I was suitably tickled!

This orange sapphire came in for valuation and under microscopic examination something truly beautiful and very amusing was revealed. Continue reading »

Dec 222010
 

Admin: Antoinette Matlins is a Guest Author for the AIJV.
Here, Antoinette warns of the dangers surrounding the new “composite ruby” and reflects on the trade’s responsibilities to educate.

Rubies remain one of the most popular of all the precious gems, and following the recent publicity surrounding Jessica Simpson’s ruby and diamond engagement ring, are likely to become even more so.

A few years ago this would have been good news to the jewelry trade, but today it may spell disaster for many retailers, designers, buyers and sellers of estate jewelry, and bench jewelers when serious and irreparable damage occurs to a “ruby” in the course of normal wear or, worse yet, when being mounted, re-mounted, re-sized, and so on. Shock sets in when a ruby becomes a molten glob on the workbench, or when its appearance is horribly marred by acid etching from top to bottom, around the entire stone. And some appraisers are making matters worse. Continue reading »

Dec 032010
 

The unique diamond set in the engagement ring

As an independent jewellery valuer I have the pleasure of appraising beautiful jewellery every day, and I meet some very interesting people along the way.  None more so than a gentleman by the name of John Alderson, who had a very special diamond ring for me to value recently. You see, the diamond was no ordinary diamond; this round diamond was cut in a way I had never seen before. When I mentioned this to John I noticed a little twinkle in his eye, ‘that’s because I designed the cut and cut it myself’ he said. Now my ears pricked, how fabulous, a unique experience for me, how many people can say that they designed and cut a diamond all by themselves? Not many for sure! So we embarked on a trip down memory lane, John remembered everything like it was yesterday. Continue reading »

Nov 262010
 
Green sapphire crown and a synthetic ruby pavilion

Figure 1

Admin: Alan Hodgkinson is a Special Guest Author for the AIJV. Here is an excerpt from his soon to be released book ‘Gem Testing Techniques’

Nothing could be easier than to identify a gemstone as a composite (doublet or triplet) when confronted by a loose gemstone.  A view of the junction plane will normally reveal the dual component quite easily, regardless of the skill of the maker of such counterfeit gemstones. Continue reading »